Follow the adventures of Samson, a spoiled three year old German Shepherd, and his fellow canine friends.

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Guess I’ll just sleep on the floor then…

Guess I’ll just sleep on the floor then…

a message from asiberianhuskypup


hi! i have a problem and i would really appreciate any help you could deliver! my pup koda gets really excited and starts to jump up on me and then starts to bite me, not nip, bite. i try to correct him but my parents dont let me... they say my techniques (which i learned by Cesar Millan) are "stupid rules". im only 14 years old and obviously dont have a say in anything pretty much so what do you think i should do? im so sad because ive been wanted a dog my entire life and i want him to be good.

huskyhuddle:

Ugh yes Balto will do this sometimes when I’m not giving him attention, if he feels  ignored or he needs something and I haven’t noticed he’ll try and nip and pull and my clothes.  I will be honest when extremely excited Hubble and Ani both have issues with jumping. So you are definitely not the only one to have issues like this.

What we did and continue to do is teach them to sit for pets. When we were first starting this we would have them sit and hold a treat to their nose and pet them. When we were done with affection we would allow them to have the treat and give them praise.

I’m not sure if this happens when you get home but it does when I do. So we ignore them and withhold pets and affection until Ani remembers to pop a squat or keep four on the floor. They she gets lots of praise and “I’m so glad to see you” cuddles. Balto is different and when REALLY excited he will run from across the room and leap on you. We had to work with him in the same way we did with Ani to tone things down. Hubble learned bad habits from Ani and so he is getting remedial training as well…

They are MUCH better since we have been doing this. Cesar Milan does have a reputation of dominance training and antagonizing dogs. This does not mean that ALL his advice is bad. Your parents are watching out for your dog and the relationship Koda forms with you and your family. I’m not sure what he said to do in this situation but we have found with huskies and many other dogs, any form of punishment promotes distrust and uncertainty and can even make them feel the need to retailiate. So things like kneeing them in the chest isn’t a good idea. Just turn your back and ignore them completely, don’t even speak to Koda until he has calmed. Then turn and give him the sit command or the hand signal, when he sits, pet him and be excited about seeing him. Praise him for good behavior.

If its during play, do something similar. Stop playing, drop the toy, turn away from him. When he stops jumping redirect the biting with a toy. Don’t bite him back… or anything weird, no slapping his snout away or anything like that. Biting is very much part of play for dogs, and my huskies really love to chomp on each other. Its just about teaching him that he should play differently with people. He probably doesn’t know he’s hurting you. But when the playtime with mom stops he’ll begin to understand well maybe I shouldn’t do that…. If he’s playing really rough with you in the house then I would try taking him on longer walks, or to the park, or on a run, get the excess energy out of him.

Huskies are STUBBORN, SO STUBBORN. it will take time and consistency. When we were getting Hubble we visited tons of dog shows, the only dogs that jumped all over me and howled and got excited were huskies… the other dogs were like statues of perfect behavior. Koda is a good dog! Don’t forget that, he’s still learning, mine still are to even though Ani and Balto are two years old. If you need anymore help ask away! I’m happy to help! Let me know how Koda does! 

Also sometimes you can’t reward with super excited petting because it might entice them to jump up again. At first at least. See what works for you guys, but if your dog is jumping up and you ignore them until they settle down, going back at them with a high energy could prompt them to pop right back up again. Reward them with a treat or calm praise until they get the idea first, then you can try and amp it up to see if they’ll still remain calm. Always reward them for choosing to be calm. 

This video might be of help, too!

awwww-cute:

Meet Ginger. Ginger is not smart. We love her anyway

awwww-cute:

Meet Ginger. Ginger is not smart. We love her anyway

a message from Anonymous


You're not getting g rid of him are you????

Omg no never!! I was just talking about in the future. I really want to get another dog once I am out of school and get a stable job. I was originally considering another GSD but I think I’m going to get a smaller dog instead!

dogsamazing:

Friends adorable pitbull made my heart melt.

dogsamazing:

Friends adorable pitbull made my heart melt.

ispeakdawg:

cheese??! where?!

ispeakdawg:

cheese??! where?!

(via puppies-and-dogs-oh-my)

So, I think I’ve made a decision.

First of all, I want to start out by saying I love Samson to death. I love him to the moon and back. I am so, so glad I went with my gut and got a German Shepherd, fully knowing how much work it was going to be. I am so glad to put in the work, because he is totally worth it. I get a lot of complements on how he’s such a beautiful dog or how well behaved he is and it makes me feel good because I know all the work I put in with him the last 3 years (and the work I continue to do with him every single day, there is literally not a day where we do no work, he has to) has paid off. He’s such a silly guy and has a huge personality and I’m just crazy about him. 

However, I don’t think in the future I’ll get another one. I’m lucky enough that I have been able to set my own schedule as far as school and work goes so that I’d always have a couple of free hours to give Samson the daily training and exercise he needs. But I’m going to be done with school in another year and depending on the job I get, I might not have the same flexibility in my schedule. I know I definitely want another dog, and I know I will always have dogs in my life, but I think Samson might be my one and only German Shepherd. It just wouldn’t be fair to get a breed like a German Shepherd and be doubtful that I’d have the time enough to work with them in the way they need. 

Not only that, but I don’t know if we’d be able to afford a house with a big enough yard to justify two German Shepherds. Also it’s apparently very difficult to find a good, reputable breeder in this area. I really, really lucked out with Samson’s breeder. I’m realizing just how lucky I was now that we’re in an area where you see so many poorly bred Shepherds. 

Plus I’ve always had large breed dogs. Our first dog was a Lab/Collie/Golden Retriever mix. Then my first dog was a Lab/PIt Bull mix. Now I have 100lb Samson. I think it shall be small dogs for me in the future!

Top Ten Most Popular Dog Breeds and Their Common Health Problems

Let’s face it, we all love our dogs. Some people love big dogs, some people love little dogs. Some people have a soft spot for Yorkies while others would rather adopt any mixed breed dog from their local shelter. Regardless, each breed comes with their own specific health risks and concerns. Whether you prefer one breed over another or just love dogs in general, it’s important to know what health problems your dog could have.

And so, without further ado, according to AKC registration records and the AKC Canine Health Foundation, these are the top ten most popular dog breeds and the health concerns associated with them. 

10. Dachshunds 

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These little guys were originally bred as hunting dogs. They have three distinct coat styles (Smooth, Wirehair, and Longhair) as well as two different body builds: Miniature and Standard. Some common health issues for these small dogs include epilepsy, intervertebral disc disease, patellar luxation, and spinal cord injury. View the full list, with links to each specific health concern, here

9. Rottweiler

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This inherent protector does best when given a job to do, whether it’s police work or therapy work. They are protective of their family, yet are loving and oftentimes have a goofy personality. Some common health issues for this large breed dog are cataracts, fibrosarcoma, hip dysplasia, hypothyroidism, osteosarcoma, and periodontal disease. View the full list with descriptions of each disease here

8. Poodle

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Poodles are one of the most intelligent breeds of dogs. They come in many colors and three builds: Standard, Miniature, and Toy. These active guys require a fair bit of exercise, as well as regular grooming. Common health concerns for this eye-catching pup are various allergies, epilepsy, hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, progressive renal atrophy, squamous cell carcinoma, and von Willebrand’s disease. See the full list and descriptions of each disease here

7. Boxer

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The Boxer is an intelligent, alert, energetic mid-sized dog who loves people. The Boxer was originally bred for dog fighting and bating large game such as boar and bison, making them a powerful dog. However, today’s Boxer is much softer and gentler, often seeking attention from small children. The AKC only lists three common health problems for these guys: cardiomyopathy, degenerative myelopathy, and renal disease. Click here for descriptions of each. 

6. Yorkshire Terrier

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Yorkies offer a whole lot of dog in a little package. Though they are small, they are a terrier, making them brave, determined, and energetic. Though they are now pampered purse pooches, they were originally bred to catch rats in clothing mills in Yorkshire, England (for which they are named). Due to their small size, they require little exercise, but lots of mental stimulation to keep them from getting bored! These little guys often suffer from cataracts, inflammatory bowel disease, pancreatitis, renal failure, and tracheal collapse. Click here to see the full list and descriptions of each health concern. 

5. Bulldog

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Note: the AKC website did not specify which type of Bulldog, so by default I’m going to go with the English Bulldog. Click here see the French Bull and here to see the American Bulldog. 

These block-headed guys are known for their resolute demeanor and dignified looks. Originally bred for bull bating, these dogs were once tenacious and fierce. Now, however, they gentle and protective. Common concerns for them are brachycephalic syndrome, cleft palate, hypothyroidism, and mitral valve disease. For the full list with descriptions, click here

4. Beagle

[x]

This “miniature foxhound” is known for it’s hunting ability and happy-go-lucky personality. The name “Beagle” is thought to come from the French word “be’geule,” referring to the braying sound the dogs made while on the hunt. They have a short, easy-to-care-for coat, making them a relatively low-maintenance family dog. Health issues to be aware of with these guys are allergies, epilepsy, factor VII deficiency, intervertebral disc disease, lymphoma, obesity, separation anxiety, and transitional cell carcinoma. Click here for the full list. 

3. Golden Retriever

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The combination of the Golden’s willingness to please and intelligence makes it one of the most popular breeds in the United States year after year. Able to perform many tasks, from bird dogs to therapy assistance to rescue work, the Golden proves itself not only to be a loving family pet, but a dedicated worker. They are active and energetic, so they require quite a lot of exercise, and their water-repellant undercoat needs regular brushing. Common health concerns for these guys are atopic dermatitis, elbow dysplasia, hip dysplasia, lymphoma,  mast cell tumors, and soft-tissue sarcoma. Click here for the full list. 

2. German Shepherd

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Hailed as the world’s leading police and guard dog, this breed goes far beyond their 9-5 duties. Their success as a herding dog and their dedication to their families helps them consistently top the lists as one of the most popular breeds. They are energetic and fun-loving, though exercise and mental stimulation are an absolute must to keep them happy and healthy. Health concerns that affect them are demyelination, inflammatory bowel disease, lymphoma, megaesophagus, and pancreatic acinar atrophy. View the full list here

1. Labrador Retriever

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Though the breed has experienced immense popularity in the United States, its origins stem from our neighbors to the north: Canada. They are gentle, intelligent, and family-friendly, excelling not only as a pet but as service dogs and hunting companions. They are easily trainable and typically great with children. Common health risks for labs include cataracts, elbow and hip dysplasia, leptospirosis, retinal dysplasia, and tricuspid valve dysplasia. View the full list and descriptions here

Always make sure to bring your dog in for regular veterinary check-ups to ensure your dog lives a long and healthy life!

sandfullofsugars:


I seriously can not handle the cute.

sandfullofsugars:

I seriously can not handle the cute.

(via puppies-and-dogs-oh-my)